A Death in Destrehan

A Death in Destrehan

By Bob Herbert, Op-Ed Columnist / New York Times Destrehan, Louisiana, February 1, 2007  On the afternoon of Oct. 7, 1974, a mob of 200 enraged whites, many of them students, closed in on a bus filled with black students that was trying to pull away from the local high school. The people in the mob were in a high-pitched frenzy. They screamed racial epithets and bombarded the bus with rocks and bottles. The students on the bus were terrified. When a…

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Gary Tyler Walks Free from Angola After 41 Years Imprisoned

Gary Tyler Walks Free from Angola After 41 Years Imprisoned

Democracy Now! May 2, 2016 In Louisiana, Gary Tyler has walked free from the Angola prison after serving 41 years for a murder many believe he did not commit. Tyler, an African American, has been jailed since he was 16 years old after an all-white jury convicted him based entirely on the statements of four witnesses who later recanted their testimony. His case has been called one of the greatest miscarriages of justice in the modern history of the United…

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Gary Tyler finally released!

Gary Tyler finally released!

St Charles Herald Guide By Anna Thibodeauz April 29, 2016 After serving 41 years in prison for the 1974 shooting death of Timothy Weber, Gary Tyler of St. Rose pleaded guilty to manslaughter as part of a plea agreement in the decades old case and walked out of court today (April 29) a free man. Until today’s hearing before Judge Lauren Lemmon, Tyler had maintained his innocence but told Lemmon he wanted to accept responsibility for his role in the…

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After more than 4 decades in prison, Gary Tyler finally free

After more than 4 decades in prison, Gary Tyler finally free

KATC ABC TV By CHEVEL JOHNSON Associated Press NEW ORLEANS (AP) – After almost 42 years at Louisiana’s maximum security prison, Gary Tyler is a free man. Tyler had been jailed at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola since he was 16, convicted of first-degree murder for the 1974 slaying of a fellow Destrehan High School student amid rising racial tensions surrounding school integration. Now 57, he was released Friday. Norris Henderson, a counselor helping ease Tyler’s re-entry into society,…

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A long time for killing

A long time for killing

MWC News by Michael Parenti September 22, 2015 Today, across the nation, we witness homicidal violence delivered against unarmed people by law enforcement officers. These beatings and killings are carried out with something close to impunity. The cops almost always get away with murder. Moreover, these crimes are nothing new; they are longstanding in practice. A study of police brutality in three major cities—conducted just about half a century ago in 1967—found that all the victims had one thing in…

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Free at last?

Free at last?

Alice Through the Macro Lens June 27, 2012 He always had a feeling it would always come down to just one person. One governor to agree to sign the release. One judge to admit his mistake. One man to cleanse his soul and confess his sin. On Monday 25th June 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States of America held that “The Eighth Amendment forbids a sentencing scheme that mandates life in prison without possibility of parole for juvenile homicide offenders.” He was…

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The Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

The Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

Maine Coast Now By Lawrence Reichard February 14, 2007 Two days ago I opened the New York Times and there it was, the first new article on Gary Tyler in years. Never mind Katrina, this man has been living his own personal hell in Louisiana for 33 years, two thirds of his life, and there is no end in sight. Gary Tyler has been buried alive by the state of Louisiana, and it’s all legal. Gary’s crime? Being in the…

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“They Beat Gary So Bad”

“They Beat Gary So Bad”

By Bob Herbert, Op-Ed Columnist / New York Times  St. Rose, Louisiana, February 8, 2007  Juanita Tyler lives in a neat one-story house that sits behind a glistening magnolia tree that dominates the small front lawn. She is 74 now and unfailingly gracious, but she admits to being tired from a lifetime of hard work and trouble. I went to see her to talk about her son, Gary. The Tylers are black. In 1974, when Gary was 16, he was accused of…

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Gary Tyler’s Lost Decades

Gary Tyler’s Lost Decades

By Bob Herbert, Op-Ed Columnist / New York Times Destrehan, Louisiana, February 5, 2007  The term time warp could have been coined for this rural town of 11,000 residents that sits beside, and just a little below, the Mississippi River. A remnant of the sugar-plantation era, the region’s racially troubled past is always here, seldom spoken about but inescapable, like the murk in the air of a perpetually stalled weather front. The Harry Hurst Middle School is on the site of the…

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