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National Conference of Black Lawyers calls for Gary’s release

National Conference of Black Lawyers calls for Gary’s release

Gary Tyler was born in July 1958. Originally sentenced to death, he now is serving a life sentence without possibility of parole to comply with the 1976 U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling finding Louisiana’s death penalty unconstitutional. Gary was convicted in January 1977, at the age of 17, for first degree murder in the death of a 13 year old white boy that occurred when Gary was 16 years old. The murder of the 13 year old took place in a…

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Enacting forgiveness and redemption

Enacting forgiveness and redemption

A passion play in prison The Economist By C.D. May 15, 2012 IT IS painfully hot and dry in the rodeo arena at Louisiana State Penitentiary, known as Angola, the largest maximum-security prison in America. Under a blazing sun American flags hang limply around the sand-covered enclosure, where 70 prisoners are acting out a unique version of “The Life of Jesus Christ”. By the time the three ingeniously constructed crosses are raised on a small hill of dirt, the physical…

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Supreme Court strikes down mandatory life terms for juveniles

Supreme Court strikes down mandatory life terms for juveniles

The 5-4 decision invalidates laws in 28 states that required such sentences for young murderers. More than 2,000 prisoners could now receive new sentences or parole hearings. Los Angeles Times By David G. Savage June 25, 2012 WASHINGTON — It is cruel and unusual punishment to send a young murderer to die in prison if a judge has not weighed whether his youth and the nature of his crime merited a shorter prison term, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The…

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Bibliography: The Case of Gary Tyler

Bibliography: The Case of Gary Tyler

Legal Lynching in Louisiana, The Case that Refuses to Die The Nation, March 12, 1989. Tyler Seeks Pardon in ’74 Shooting The Louisiana Weekly, May 6, 1989 New Doubts in ’74 Racial Killing Houston Chronicle, June 17, 1989 La. Black Seeks Pardon, Still Denies Racial Slaying The Atlanta Constitution, October 24, 1989 Why is this Man in Prison? The Guardian, December 6, 1989 Pardon Decision in Racial Slaying Expected Tomorrow in Louisiana New York Times, December 13, 1989 In Prison…

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Gary Tyler’s Quest for Justice

Gary Tyler’s Quest for Justice

Sports figures are joining the crusade to free a Louisiana man convicted as a teenager of a murder he didn’t commit. The Nation By Dave Zirin April 4, 2007 The history of the American legal system is scarred with instances of injustice: the Haymarket martyrs, Sacco and Vanzetti, the Scottsboro Boys, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Add to this list the case of Gary Tyler, convicted of murder at the age of 16. Tyler’s case was remarkable because at the time…

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A long time for killing

A long time for killing

MWC News by Michael Parenti September 22, 2015 Today, across the nation, we witness homicidal violence delivered against unarmed people by law enforcement officers. These beatings and killings are carried out with something close to impunity. The cops almost always get away with murder. Moreover, these crimes are nothing new; they are longstanding in practice. A study of police brutality in three major cities—conducted just about half a century ago in 1967—found that all the victims had one thing in…

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Free at last?

Free at last?

Alice Through the Macro Lens June 27, 2012 He always had a feeling it would always come down to just one person. One governor to agree to sign the release. One judge to admit his mistake. One man to cleanse his soul and confess his sin. On Monday 25th June 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States of America held that “The Eighth Amendment forbids a sentencing scheme that mandates life in prison without possibility of parole for juvenile homicide offenders.” He was…

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The Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

The Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

Maine Coast Now By Lawrence Reichard February 14, 2007 Two days ago I opened the New York Times and there it was, the first new article on Gary Tyler in years. Never mind Katrina, this man has been living his own personal hell in Louisiana for 33 years, two thirds of his life, and there is no end in sight. Gary Tyler has been buried alive by the state of Louisiana, and it’s all legal. Gary’s crime? Being in the…

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Free Gary Tyler: Thirty Years of Injustice by Joe Allen

Free Gary Tyler: Thirty Years of Injustice by Joe Allen

Joe Allen is the author of a three-part series on Vietnam, co-author of “Leonard Peltier: Incident at Oglala Thirty Years On,” (ISR 44, November–December 2005), and is a frequent contributor to the ISR. The article is in the current issue of the September-October 2006 issue of the International Socialist Review. GARY TYLER, at one time the youngest person on death row, turned forty-eight years old this July. He has spent thirty-two of those years in jail for a crime he…

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Legal Lynching In Louisiana The Case That Refuses To Die

Legal Lynching In Louisiana The Case That Refuses To Die

By Adam Nossiter Originally publised by The Nation Magazine  March 12, 1990  Lynchings in the Deep South are rare these days. Respectable Southerners never much cared for them anyway, although they recognized their usefulness as a way of keeping blacks in their place. Still, lynchings were awfully messy. So over the years, the starched shirt South developed a cleaner, more formal way of carrying out this larger social purpose. It used the court system. Small-town Southern justice has proved as…

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